May Book News

white coral bellslillies of the valley

 

 

 

 

 

LESLIE BUDEWITZ: Oh, my. Spring, at last! Here in NW Montana, we are overjoyed to see you licking at our toes — we don’t even mind you sending pollen up our noses! (Well, okay, I exaggerate a little. But not much.)

mary fieldsAlong with spring, I’m celebrating TWO short story award nominations. My first historical short story, “All God’s Sparrows” (Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, May-June 2018), is nominated for the 2018 Agatha Award for Best Short Story, which will be awarded at the Malice Domestic Mystery Convention in Bethesda, MD on May 4. Set in Montana Territory in 1885, it features real-life figure Mary Fields, aka Stagecoach Mary and Black Mary. Wish me luck! (And read the story on my website.)

Another short story, “With My Eyes” (Suspense Magazine, Jan-Feb 2018) is nominated for a Derringer Award, given by the Short Mystery Fiction Society, in the “long story” (4-6,000) words. It features a Seattle banker who sees what he wants to see when he falls for a gorgeous Greek woman, only to have his eyes opened on a trip to Athens. Winners will be announced in early June.chai another day (cover without quote)

And I’m getting ready to celebrate the launch of Chai Another Day, my 4th Spice Shop Mystery, on June 11. When Seattle Spice Shop owner Pepper Reece overhears an argument in an antique shop, she finds herself drawn into a murder that could implicate an old enemy, or ensnare a new friend. Read an excerpt and join me at a signing or book talk (schedule here).

You do know reading on the back deck counts as outdoor activity, right? Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give Away

I just released an audio version of Mrs. Sedwick on audible.com. They provided me with 25 free download codes to pass out to readers in exchange for a honest review on Audible’s sales page for the novel. If you are interested email me mariefmartin312@hotmail.com and I will send the code and Audibles instructions. First come, first served. I have 22 left so far.

 

 

 

https://www.audible.com/pd/Dont-Mess-with-Mrs-Sedgewick-Audiobook/B07QFRY7K6?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-148536&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_148536_rh_us

http://www.mariefmartin.com

 

Author Susan Purvis

April 2019 Author Sue Purvis  received a Silver Nautilus Award for her memoir, Go Find. Recent busy months found her teaching wilderness medicine courses, talking at a number of different venues and MTNPR radio and magazine interviews. Watch for the coming publication in University of Montana Alumni Magazine, Montanan Magazine, where her story will be a cover feature.

West Shore Community Library Lakeside, MT

Presentation and book signing.

Montanan Magazine photo shoot on Whitefish Mountain

https://susanpurvis.com/

 

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The Courage for Memoirs

By Karen Wills

In her novel, Dreamers of the Day, Mary Doria Russell has her somewhat fictionalized version of T.E. Lawrence a/k/a Lawrence of Arabia Lawrence of arabia announce his intent to write a memoir. Then he asks, “Have you heard the old joke about Job sitting on his dunghill?” Lawrence goes on, “He tells his friends all his troubles and at the end one of them says, ‘Yes, but you know…there could be a book in it!’”

The book referred to would be a memoir. But what does that mean? According to my Random House Dictionary, it’s “records of facts or events in connection with a particular subject, historical period, etc. as known to the writer or gathered from special sources.”

People send their memoirs out into the world for varied reasons. Montana’s Laura Munson wrote, This is Not the Story You Think It Is, about her decision to refuse to see herself as the victim in the breakup of her marriage.

A friend of mine who worked both as a teacher and school psychologist gained wisdom about American public education both in the South during the Civil Rights Era and on through the days of No Child Left Behind. She is writing a memoir using her varied experiences to explain her philosophy of education. The stories that shaped her views are gripping and credible.

I had a teaching experience of my own that showed me clearly the power of a well-written memoir. A student of mine was flirting with the idea of admiring Hitler.  I assigned him Elie Wiesel’s wrenching Night followed by the same author’s Dawnelie wiesel 2These depict the horrors of the Holocaust and its aftermath.  I followed that with parts of The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer. By semester’s end, my student had moved 180 degrees from his first leanings. That’s the power of a courageous memoirist.

My son has suggested that I write a memoir as my life has always fit into the forefront of the social movements and trends of my lifetime. Honestly, I don’t have the nerve. My adventures feel private and my wisdom too often the hard-won result of foolishness I’d rather keep to myself.

But here’s to the brave, vulnerable, generous people who share their stories and views in memoirs. Humanity needs them.

river with no bridge

Now available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Kindle

https://karenwills.com

Face Book: Karen Wills Author